Serum lycopene, lutein and zeaxanthin, and the risk of Alzheimer's disease mortality in older adults.

Serum lycopene, lutein and zeaxanthin, and the risk of Alzheimer's disease mortality in older adults.

PMID: 

Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2014 ;37(3-4):246-56. Epub 2013 Nov 15. PMID: 24247062

Abstract Title: 

Serum lycopene, lutein and zeaxanthin, and the risk of Alzheimer's disease mortality in older adults.

Abstract: 

BACKGROUND: Oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Accumulating evidence shows that antioxidant-rich food reduces the risk of AD by inhibiting oxidative stress. This study investigates whether serum levels of carotenoids were associated with the risk of AD mortality in a nationally representative sample of US adults.METHODS: We used data from the Third Nutrition and Health Examination Survey (NHANES III) database and the NHANES III Linked Mortality File. A total of 6,958 participants aged older than 50 years were included in this study.RESULTS: We found that high serum levels of lycopene and lutein+zeaxanthin at baseline were associated with a lower risk of AD mortality after adjustment for potential covariates. The reduction in the mortality risk was progressively raised by increasing serum lycopene (HR = 0.26, 95% CI 0.10-0.69) and lutein+zeaxanthin (HR = 0.43, 95% CI 0.22-0.85) levels. In contrast, no associations with AD mortality were observed for other serum carotenoids, including alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, and beta-cryptoxanthin.CONCLUSION: High serum levels of lycopene and lutein+zeaxanthin are associated with a lower risk of AD mortality in adults. Our findings suggest that a high intake of lycopene- or lutein+zeaxanthin-rich food may be important for reducing the AD mortality risk.

read more

11
Like
Save

Comments

Write a comment

*

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.